De Rigueur!

It was only the lightest coating, little heavier than a dusting of icing sugar, but the moment had to be captured; such fleeting moments always catch our attention. We had snow this morning.

Now, Anna, my Finnish Cat Lady friend, will laugh at me when she reads this, at my silliness for regarding this as snow. She has had 10 – 20 cm of snow for the past week or more and hasn’t yet taken to closing the windows at night. She has posted videos of her daily walks with her aging Finnish Lapphund who, with the arrival of snow, seems to have been rejuvenated and is now dashing about the place despite innumerable replacement joints, a veritable bionic dog. Even more incredible, for no Irish cat would do this, her cat walks several kilometres with her through the snow each day. No Irish cat would go for a walk with you whatever the weather, preferring the indoor life, a fireside life with room service – even in summer!

Around the garden this morning:

But, we have had an Irish snow, enough to turn the place white for a short while, long enough to snap the photographs but not deep enough to disrupt travel or normal life – the green of the grass has already come through by lunchtime. Snow is grand in such doses, a little – a very little and not very often but long enough to create that Winter Wonderland scene for an hour or so. When the moment is captured, the photographs shared and the blog written, it really should go away – to Finland! That would be a good place for it. They’re used to it there. Even the cats can live with it!

Snow that continues beyond that desirable fleeting few hours is simply a misery and I have had enough misery for this week, indeed for a long time. This week a young man, a past pupil of mine, his fiancée and unborn child all died tragically. I have fond memories of him, his siblings, cousins and parents and can only imagine the heartbreak they all feel at this time. What do you say on such occasions? What can you say?

I imagine the sorrow is like the snow, something that covers and smothers all of life, every aspect of it, but in a heavy black. And, of course, it will not pass so easily but will be the burden of many years, a lifetime.

19 thoughts on “De Rigueur!

  1. Il m’est arrivé aussi de perdre des élèves. J’ai toujours eu beaucoup de mal à m’en remettre! Encore maintenant….Sincères condoléances à la famille.

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  2. We had about the same amount of snow, but on heavily frosted ground. Fell to -5c last night and for the first time got into the pump shed so we were without water for a while. A lesson there. Sorry to hear about the tragedy – my condolences.

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      1. I have always said I’d make more – and have stored the framework from the first – but have never come round to doing it.

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  3. Your garden is so beautiful in winter I’m jealous. Mine looks untidy and unstructured. I love your pheasants. I enjoy feeding the birds but am beset by pidgeons, starlings and big birds who grab the food first. Apart from that I’m just catching up on reading and at the moment I’m enjoying Wilding by Isabella Tree. Happy and healthy New Year.

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    1. Many happy returns, Emer. I’m afraid we are managing very little gardening these days. I haven’t done anything since Wednesday afternoon and I found that very cold and hard on the hands. We have very cold weather at the moment but it is due to change from Monday onwards so we can get going again. Re the bigger birds: We have pheasants, grey crows, magpies, pigeons etc and every evening several hundred rooks come to roost on the trees on the garden boundary. I throw rolled barley on the ground and they all eat it, as do many of the smaller birds – blackbirds, starlings, chaffinches, dunnocks and robins. The smaller birds use the feeders – peanuts and nyger seed and the larger ones don’t come to those at all, except the pheasants who stand underneath for the pieces of peanuts which fall – pheasants adore peanuts and will take them from my hand.

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