Six on Saturday, 12/09/2020

Another week has passed and the air is certainly a little more chilly than we have been used to. The evenings are certainly cooler and the days are clearly shortening. It brings to mind that summer is passing and we ought to appreciate and make the most of the remainder of the season. During the week I was keeping an eye on a large drift of Colchicum autumnale, planted under a small chestnut tree (Aesculus mutabilis ‘Induta’) and feeling that they were quite hidden and that I would have to prune some of the lower branches so as to clear the view to them but the next morning the tree was suddenly see-through and the colchicums in easy view – nature’s timing is perfect at times! The leaves are already dropping and, believe it or not, the first snowdrops are peeping through! Yes, the seasons are moving along.

Very seasonally, the fields of oats which surround our garden were harvested in the last few days. It has been a horrible year for cereal farmers because of the weather and yields are expected to be down by 40%. Let’s hope there will be enough oats for our morning cereal. Farm machinery is now so big, particularly the combine harvesters, that they struggle to negotiate our very narrow road, barely moving at walking pace as they pass our garden, and there is always some damage to verges and our plantings there. There will be work to be done when they have gone but most things will recover.

Click on the first photograph to start a slideshow:

Not everything is reaching the end of their days; some plants are simply coming into their season and Aconitum ‘Ace of Hearts’ is one of those which I really like. From the moments its foliage emerges, it is an attractive plant for the leaves have a beautiful bronze tint to them but it is the intense blue which steals the show at this time of year:

Click on the first photograph to start a slideshow:

Of course, it is also the season for phlox and, though there is a good number of them in the garden, many are without names for phlox is one of those plants which lends itself to division, propagation and distribution and several of those growing in our garden bear names such as, “the one that came from Iris Riley” or “the one that Jim Nolan gave us years ago” – I quote the head gardener for these names! Whatever the name, they are attractive and reliable plants and well worth their place in the garden.

Click on the first photograph to start a slideshow:

Astrantias are hardly autumn plants but those which were cut back earlier in the year when they had finished flowering have responded to recent rains and produced another good flowering. They have become a very popular plant over past years and demand has prompted mass production, generally by micro-propagation, which I feel very often leads to weakish plants which simply do not thrive after their first year in the garden. Plants produced by this method certainly do not compare for vigour with a plant received from a friend’s garden, dug up, passed on and quickly replanted.

Click on the first photograph to start a slideshow:

It is time for a final hoorah and say farewell to the geraniums. Few plants serve us so very well in the garden but at this time of the year I must admit that flowers are quite sparse on the plants here, except for Geranium wallichianum ‘Havana Blues’ which continues to be covered in flowers. Otherwise, it was a case of finding an odd flower here and there but they are beautiful individually as well as when they give a big display.

Click on the first photograph to start a slideshow:

Finally, this week, a selection of views of the garden at what is, there or thereabouts, the end of the summer.

Click on the first photograph to start a slideshow:

To read more contributors to the Six on Saturday theme go to The Propagator’s entry for today: https://thepropagatorblog.wordpress.com/2020/09/12/six-on-saturday-12-09-2020/ ,scroll down to the comments and you will find other bloggers have posted links to their Saturday entry there. Lots to read!

33 thoughts on “Six on Saturday, 12/09/2020

  1. Lovely images if the changing seasons in your garden! What is the almost white geranium with the pink veining?
    I really enjoy your weekly six … to distract from UK rule of six!!!
    Stay safe

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Hi Angela, When I click on one of the photographs it starts a slideshow and then the names appear at the bottom of the screen – the names I have put on the photographs when I saved them on my laptop. I imagine the one you are talking about is G. sanguineum ‘Striatum’.

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      1. Thank you, Paddy, that’s the one. I first noticed it in Colclough Walled Garden and promptly lost its name. I have a great weakness for Hardy Geraniums and Primula … unfortunately I have a very small cottage garden and everything has to earn its space!

        Liked by 1 person

  2. I have to admit to a little bit of Astrantia envy. I don’t think I can grow them here due to an unfriendly climate.
    Your garden is gorgeous…a testament to both design and gentle weather. And lots of work.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. Thanks Paddy for a lovely journey round your garden! I find I oscillate between “tidying” the Geraniums to the ground and cherishing those little gems of flowers they produce at this time of year! I have a particularly pretty one “Splish Splash” gifted to me by Mary and it has been producing flowers for months!

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Always a joy to see your garden
    Love phlox and astrantia and all your geraniums Do you have pestemons? I think these give really good value and the colour range is excellent, plus varied heights to accommodate different locations..

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Lovely to get pretty much the full tour of your garden, so many good plants there and still room for space, aka lawn. I need to up my Astrantia game, I have a large and getting larger clump of a mediocre seedling that’s not even a decent white. The point about micro-propped varieties is noted though.

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  6. Despite the shortening days and the chill in the air, your garden is still looking very good. The photos are fabulous. I was interested in the aconitum, as the one I have flowers much earlier and a later variety would be useful for some autumn colour.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. While looking at your collection of Astrantias I realised that mine are all ‘pale and interesting’. I need to get some colour! That will be rectified. You have also reminded me that I need to add a Phlox, probably a white one to replace the one I’ve mysteriously lost.

    I enjoyed the tour of your garden, it looks so perfectly tended, or perhaps a better word is ‘loved’.

    A great Six for this weekend.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Your photos and flowers are lovely. I have Schizostylis in flower now and I love that flower even though it can be a bit thuggish but very easy to pull up! Best wishes

    Liked by 1 person

    1. We grew schizostylis at one time but managed to get rid of it. Later a piece came in with a clump of dieramas from a friend and I find it popping up year after year despite my best attempts to root it out.

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    1. The harvesters are really huge; they struggle to manage to drive along our road with wheels of both sides on the verges and driver doing his best to avoid going into the dykes. They do a little damage but it’s hard to blame them. (On other occasions they have done a lot of damage and they were entirely to blame!)

      Liked by 1 person

    1. I’ve never saved seed from it, Pádraig, and it most likely would not come true from seed. Better to have a piece of the plant itself – and, if you remind me, I’ll lift a piece for you; say, late October? I’ll forget, I always do, so the reminder is essential.

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  9. nice Sixty! i have tried and failed to grow astrantia, they seems to dislike my conditions. i have planted a few this year in the border at the bottom of the slight slope, it is the wettest (a relative term) and the irrigation system will keep it that way. hopefully they will behave.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Am I in violation of the rules? I took it as six topics/plants/whatever. Yes, the astrantias seem to prefer a little moisture to do well.

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      1. That’s very kind of you. I enjoy photography and am inclined to have a lot of photographs and it is a pleasure to share with such a group as you have organised. Many thanks.

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